Pay Your 2011 Taxes With Working Capital Loans

Written by on March 16, 2012 in Business Insights, Finance And Lending - 1 Comment
Working Capital Loans Pay Taxes

Here at the laboratories of Direct Capital, we often experiment to see what working capital loans can be used for. The answer, as always, is many things.

Did you know that you can use working capital loans to pay for your taxes, though? If you answer is no—or even if your answer is yes—let me tell you a little bit more about this wondrous application of the working capital loan.

Using Working Capital Loans For Taxes

If you have a 2011 tax bill due, you can actually do this very easily. Simply apply for a working capital loan from, say, Direct Capital. If all goes well, you should be the proud owner of a working capital loan that you can use to quickly pay off your taxes and get that monkey off your back. Because it’s the IRS, I should probably say monkey in a suit.

You’re not limited in terms of the taxes you can pay, either. State tax? Sure. Federal tax? Why not. Excise tax? Go for it. The important thing is that after you get your paperwork in order, file and find out how much you owe, a working capital loan can help you cover it. It’s simple and effective.

The only limitation is that you cannot pay back taxes with working capital loans, so if you’re way behind on your payments for some reason, it’s not quite as helpful. That doesn’t mean you can’t use a working capital loan to take care of other expenses and free up funds for those tax payments, however.

So that’s a brief primer to using working capital loans to pay your taxes. Think you’ll consider doing so?

 


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One Comment on "Pay Your 2011 Taxes With Working Capital Loans"

  1. Venture capital Texas April 26, 2012 at 5:28 pm ·

    Thanks for this very useful info you have provided us. I will bookmark this for future reference and refer it to my friends. More power to your blog.

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