Why Your Business Should Have March Madness

March Madness small business
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There are two kinds of March Madness, but one matters more than the other for small business.

The first, of course, is the March Madness NCAA basketball tournaments. Workers sink millions of man-hours into following it, and while that productivity loss generally draws frowns, it’s a great team-building opportunity. Put together an office pool, give your team short breaks to check in on games and watch the camraderie and good-natured trash talk flow. We hope it’s good-natured, anyways.

The second kind of March Madness should be right in your wheelhouse. It’s a kind of mania for closing sales, finishing out Q1 in excellent shape and setting the tone for the rest of 2013. It’s a frenetic kind of pace to keep up, but like March Madness itself, it doesn’t involve any actual madness.

You can intertwine the two kinds of March Madness to try to get more out of your sales team, but ultimately this is about achieving small business success by finding your groove at the end of the quarter. If you’re like most companies, you have those Q1 goals to hit or exceed, and there’s no time like the last week-and-a-half to crank up the pace a little bit.

So how do you do it? Here’s a few suggestions from the Direct Capital team.

  • Set up a company-wide bracket competition. The winner might get a free lunch, a gift card or just bragging rights, but it’s a great way to foster friendly competition at the end of the month.
  • Set a stretch goal for the end of the month, with similar rewards available for those who go above and beyond.
  • Challenge yourself to be the best you can be at the end of the month. A little forward momentum can go a long way, as any 16 seed can tell you.

So enjoy March Madness, and then it’s on to April. Hope it’s been a great 2013 for you thus far!

 

1 Comment

  1. Small term business goals help you get organized and give structure to your plans. Rather than thinking on a very wide basis, start with a small strategy and execute it successfully.

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